Crann Nollag

I like beads, I like Christmas trees, and I like hats.

Here is my newest design, featured in the brand spanking new online knitting magazine I like Knitting, Crann Nollag, beaded beanie. This hat is knit with Life in the Long Grass Silk Merino, a lovely soft shimmery sock yarn, hand dyed in County Cork. The yarn is “an airy pearlescent with faint tints of gray, green and mauve”. 2014-12-31 19.48.46The hat is knit in the round, with a beaded tree motif repeated in different colours all around the circumference of the hat. The yarn, with its icy tones of mid-winter is a perfect backdrop for the colourful hues of green and blue trees.

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I enjoyed knitting this hat; so much I made two, one for me and one the bookworm. The beanie is close fitting, but knit the larger size if you want a slouchy look! Both hats were knit from one skein of yarn and there even was a wee bit left over!

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World Famous Designer


Credit: Practical Publishing

Okay well, not just yet! But I just had my first published pattern in a real live tangible magazine!  My Tír na nÓg shawl pattern became available last week in Knit Now magazine. So now I can add knitwear designer extraordinaire to my title.

The shawl design is inspired by old Irish myths and legends, the tales of Fionn Mac Cumhaill and the the Fianna. In Irish folk lore, Tír na nÓg is best known for the tale of Niamh Cinn Ór and Oisín, the son of the warrior Fionn Mac Cumhaill.  In the legend, Oisín and Niamh of Tír na nÓg fall in love. She brings him across the sea to Tír na nÓg on a magical white horse that can travel over water. After spending three years in the land of eternal youth, Oisín becomes homesick and wishes to return to Ireland. Niamh reluctantly allows him return across the sea on her magical horse, but forewarns him never to touch the Irish soil. When he returns, he finds that in reality three hundred years have passed in Ireland. While helping some men, move a rock, Oisín falls from the horse and instantly transforms into an ancient man.  He wanders around Ireland for years and eventually encounters St. Patrick and tells him his tale. He dies without ever returning to Tír na nÓg.

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The shawl was knit with Titus yarn from baa ram ewe in Eccup and Bramley Baths. Titus is a  four-ply yarn composed of fifty per cent Wensleydale, twenty per cent Bluefaced Leicester and thirty percent Alpaca, manufacture in Yorkshire in the UK and inspired by the local landscape.


Líonta Iascaigh take two

IMG_4033Six months or so ago, I published líonta iascaigh, a retro style turban pattern. Actually, I cant believe that it’s been that long. Insert aghast smiley face here. Well, the hat has a trickily brim assembly, and I decided to knit another prototype, this time in Studio Donegal, Soft Donegal and have the hat test knit again. And while I was tackling the brim, I took a few bad quality photos and made a photo tutorial to assist with the construction of the knit. many of the  photos came out either really dark or out of focus, but I hope you can make out what I am doing. You can down load Líonta Iascaigh Brim Assembly photo tutorial here.


You can buy the updated and reformatted Líonta iascaigh pattern on etsy! And now is available for purchase on ravelry too!



Abhainn Airgid


DSCF1112A shawl



a cowl!

So this is what STwist Wool became, Abhainn Airgid, the silver river. It can be worn as a cowl, cape ,small shawl or a bolero for a princess. The button is used to fasten the shawl in different ways. The lacy rib acts as a button hole and because of this, it can be worn tight or loose and even twisted and closed at the back!

Pattern for Abhainn Airgid will be available in the near future….



Duilleoga an Fhómhair revisited

headshotThis was one of the very first patterns I designed last year. I decided to revisit this cabled brimmed hat and create alternative sizes. The pattern now has four different sizes, child, adult small, adult medium and adult large. The original hat was designed for ” adult small”, though was quickly stolen by the bookworm princess aged 7 and worn as a more floppy, slouchy beanie than originally intended. The largest size is pictured here, and yes, I have stolen the look from my daughter, more slouchy, and loose. This version was knit in Studio Donegal Aran Tweed, but any aran or worsted yarn would be suitable.

You can buy the new updated pattern here!



moll etain

In Celtic mythology, Étaín outshone all other women in beauty and gentleness. Consequently she became a victim of both desire and jealousy. When the fairy king Midir fell in love with her, his wife Fuamnach, transformed Étaín into a pool of water and later, into a scarlet fly, to be blown over the ocean for seven years. When she was finally able to return to Ireland, she fell into a glass of wine which was drunk by a woman who longed for a child. Étaín was reborn and she later married a High King of Ireland. Eventually Midir found her again and they transformed into swans and flew away. Continue reading