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I like Knitting!

Yes. I do. I like creating new patterns even more so!

Here are four of my recent patterns which were published in I like Knitting recently.  I like knitting is a US based knitting ezine or online magazine.

Colors-of-the-Sea-Shawl

An Farraige Shawl

Lemon-Dipped-Shawl Lemon-Dipped-Shawl-1

Liomoid Sorbet Shawl

Both An Farraige Shawl and Liomoid Sorbet Shawl can be found in I Like Knitting August Ediition

Sensational-Seaweed-Wrap Sensational-Seaweed-Wrap-1 Sensational-Seaweed-Wrap-2

Feamainn wrap or cowl!

Luminous-Lighthouse-Shawl

Teach Solais shawl!

Both Teach Solais and Feamainn Wrap patterns were published in the June Edition of I Like Knitting.

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Tír na nÓg Shawl Pattern

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Last year, I designed Tír na nÓg shawl and had my first published pattern in Knit Now, a UK based magazine. And now the rights have reverted back to me. This pattern can now be purchased in my ravelry store.

The shawl design is inspired by old Irish myths and legends, the tales of Fionn Mac Cumhaill and the the Fianna. In Irish folk lore, Tír na nÓg is best known for the tale of Niamh Cinn Ór and Oisín, the son of the warrior Fionn Mac Cumhaill.  In the legend, Oisín and Niamh of Tír na nÓg fall in love. She brings him across the sea to Tír na nÓg on a magical white horse that can travel over water. After spending three years in the land of eternal youth, Oisín becomes homesick and wishes to return to Ireland. Niamh reluctantly allows him return across the sea on her magical horse, but forewarns him never to touch the Irish soil. When he returns, he finds that in reality three hundred years have passed in Ireland. While helping some men, move a rock, Oisín falls from the horse and instantly transforms into an ancient man.  He wanders around Ireland for years and eventually encounters St. Patrick and tells him his tale. He dies without ever returning to Tír na nÓg.

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Deirdre na nDolais

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My newest pattern designed for an Irish Tourism workshop, is designed using A life in the Long Grass merino fingering weight yarn in a custom colour known as Red Rust.

This shawl is from my Celtic mythology collection. Deirdre na nDólás or Deirdre of Sorrows was one of the most tragic women in Irish mythology. Her beauty and the havoc it would cause was foretold before her birth. A king would covet her, his rage and jealousy the cause of murder, destruction and war, and murder before finally destroying Deirdre herself, her lover and his family.
The Shawl is a crescent shape, beginning with a garter tab. As the shawl grows, the twisted yarn overs create two spines, leaving a bell shaped blank canvas for the Celtic knot work depicting a tormented or broken heart.
When the motif is complete, stitches are cast on for the the knit on edge comprising of a braid, symbolizing Naoise and his two brothers, an intertwining circular cable representing the lovers, Naoise and Deirdre and a beaded lace edge symbolizes Deirdre’s tears of sorrow and grief

You can buy the pattern on ravelry. If you would like to be in with a chance to win a digital copy of the pattern, via email or gifted through ravelry, you can do one of the following

  • Comment below
  • Join my newly formed group on ravelry!

Entries will close June 1st , midnight Irish Time! I will draw a winner at random and notify the winner shortly afterwards.

Anybody who buys the pattern before June 1st 2015,  will be entered into a draw for a pattern kit including a custom  dyed skein of Red Rust from Life in the Long Grass, beads, printed colour pattern and a cotton tote to hold every thing together.

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World Famous Designer

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Credit: Practical Publishing

Okay well, not just yet! But I just had my first published pattern in a real live tangible magazine!  My Tír na nÓg shawl pattern became available last week in Knit Now magazine. So now I can add knitwear designer extraordinaire to my title.

The shawl design is inspired by old Irish myths and legends, the tales of Fionn Mac Cumhaill and the the Fianna. In Irish folk lore, Tír na nÓg is best known for the tale of Niamh Cinn Ór and Oisín, the son of the warrior Fionn Mac Cumhaill.  In the legend, Oisín and Niamh of Tír na nÓg fall in love. She brings him across the sea to Tír na nÓg on a magical white horse that can travel over water. After spending three years in the land of eternal youth, Oisín becomes homesick and wishes to return to Ireland. Niamh reluctantly allows him return across the sea on her magical horse, but forewarns him never to touch the Irish soil. When he returns, he finds that in reality three hundred years have passed in Ireland. While helping some men, move a rock, Oisín falls from the horse and instantly transforms into an ancient man.  He wanders around Ireland for years and eventually encounters St. Patrick and tells him his tale. He dies without ever returning to Tír na nÓg.

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The shawl was knit with Titus yarn from baa ram ewe in Eccup and Bramley Baths. Titus is a  four-ply yarn composed of fifty per cent Wensleydale, twenty per cent Bluefaced Leicester and thirty percent Alpaca, manufacture in Yorkshire in the UK and inspired by the local landscape.

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Róisín

 

photo 4Róisín, meaning little rose, is a common girl’s name here in Ireland and perfectly suited to this ice-cream coloured shawl with a seemingly intricate rose patterned lace-edging. In fact, this shawl is very simple to knit. The lace repeats are easy to construct and a doddle to commit to memory. The Yarn is from The Mottled Sheep and suitably named Burnished Rose. Burnished Rose, a sock/fingering weight, 75/25 super-wash merino and nylon mix of hand-dyed yarn from Siobhan Power’s etsy shop The Mottled Sheep. The shawl has a top down, double triangular construction with a garter stitch edge and a simple spine. The body is begun with a garter tab and the main body is knit in stocking stitch before running into the lace edge.

 

Róisin shawl is available to purchase on ravelry now.

 

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Deora Corcra

Deora Corcra is a mini shawl made for Emma, made from Droim an Uan Merino Silk Purple Marble. The pattern is now available to purchase here.

This Merino Silk Purple Marble wool from Droim an Uan, was spun by Catherine into a two ply sport weight yarn. Fingering or lace weight yarn could also be used, if you prefer. The colour of the wool and the teardrop shaped points gave this shawl its name. The lace edge is knit first and then, the shawl is shaped using short rows. I prefer the German method of short row shaping as it gives a very neat finish, but you can use what method you prefer. You can find a tutorial of this method by Mimi Kezer here. The depth of the shawl could be decreased or increased by varying the number of stitches omitted on each short row. The shawl is finished with an eyelet boarder. The short edges are picked up and knit in garter stitch. Wet blocking is required to see the true beautiful shape of the shawl.