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Deirdre na nDolais

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My newest pattern designed for an Irish Tourism workshop, is designed using A life in the Long Grass merino fingering weight yarn in a custom colour known as Red Rust.

This shawl is from my Celtic mythology collection. Deirdre na nDólás or Deirdre of Sorrows was one of the most tragic women in Irish mythology. Her beauty and the havoc it would cause was foretold before her birth. A king would covet her, his rage and jealousy the cause of murder, destruction and war, and murder before finally destroying Deirdre herself, her lover and his family.
The Shawl is a crescent shape, beginning with a garter tab. As the shawl grows, the twisted yarn overs create two spines, leaving a bell shaped blank canvas for the Celtic knot work depicting a tormented or broken heart.
When the motif is complete, stitches are cast on for the the knit on edge comprising of a braid, symbolizing Naoise and his two brothers, an intertwining circular cable representing the lovers, Naoise and Deirdre and a beaded lace edge symbolizes Deirdre’s tears of sorrow and grief

You can buy the pattern on ravelry. If you would like to be in with a chance to win a digital copy of the pattern, via email or gifted through ravelry, you can do one of the following

  • Comment below
  • Join my newly formed group on ravelry!

Entries will close June 1st , midnight Irish Time! I will draw a winner at random and notify the winner shortly afterwards.

Anybody who buys the pattern before June 1st 2015,  will be entered into a draw for a pattern kit including a custom  dyed skein of Red Rust from Life in the Long Grass, beads, printed colour pattern and a cotton tote to hold every thing together.

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Irish Tourism Workshop

DSC02389A few weeks ago I gave a knitting workshop in Turlough House for Irish Tourism. This was part of the fabulous Nine Night North of Ireland Knitting and Craft Tour. This was a hands on knitting workshop with a wonderful bush of enthusiastic knitters.

In the workshop, I taught the ladies the unique elements of my Deirdre na nDolais shawl pattern, including a heart cable band and the cable and lace beaded edging. The knitters were particularly interested in how to add beads with a little piece of wire!

Included in the class was a unique yarn. A custom dyed fingering weight merino in a deep rusty red, hand dyed by Caroline from Life in the Long Grass.

These ladies left with all the materials need for knitting the shawl all wrapped up in a handy cotton kit bag!

kit and pattern

This Celtic Shawl pattern will be available on ravelry shortly! Keep an eye out for a special competition running along side it!

 

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Published!

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Credit: Practical Publishing

This month, I have two new patterns featured in Knit Now, a UK based knitting magazine.

First up is Cáblaí, a snug hooded and pocketed scarf, perhaps more suitable for winter, but with the crazy changeable weather we are having at the moment, I’d be happy to have it right now!

I love scarfs and hats in winter but I hate the feel of gloves on my hands as they overheat so quickly. The pockets in this hooded scarf will keep your fingers warm and cosy in icy weather without the discomfort of becoming too hot. The braided edge of the scarf and the cabled smocking look far more intricate than they actually are. They may look complicated but is in fact, mostly knits and purls with some fancy bits. The scarf is knit in beautifully soft Artesano Aran yarn, a blend of  Peruvian Highland wool and superfine Alpaca.

Next up is Dragonfly wings, a cobwebby fine beaded lace stole, perfect for the summer wedding! Its knit here in Rennie Handknits Supersoft Cashmere 4ply.

Credit: Practical Publishing

Credit: Practical Publishing

Dragonflies and damselflies are fascinating to watch. I love their lacy intricate wings and their large eyes, the essence of which I have tried to capture in this open lace beaded stole. The stole is mainly knit on 10 mm needles and beads are added with a crochet hook. As it is worked on large needles, it knits up quickly, into an open cobweb fabric.

In my (usual) hurry to post these to the wonderful Kate in Knit Now, I forgot ( didn’t have time) to take any decent photos of either item, so thanks to Practical Publishing for the use of the above two photos.

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An Irish yarn for St Patrick’s Day

anirishknitodyssey:

Great article on real Irish wool by Heather

Originally posted on nearlythere:

With the Euro having reached parity with the USD and today being St Patrick’s Day, I’m hoping some knitters are considering a trip to Ireland.

One of the most active threads on the Ireland Ravelry group is regarding info for visiting knitters. People also want to know where they can get their hands on an authentic Irish yarn. Visiting knitters are seeking some wooly experience based on images of sheep grazing in the hills of some Craggy Island, with hearty sailors wearing wool jumpers bobbing on the sea nearby. Even ifthe origins of the Aran jumper are clouded in the mists of marketing mythologydating back to the 1930s. (This can be a touchy subject for Irish knitters, since visiting North Americans, obsessed with authenticity, are known to comment “why did you let this tradition die out?” when actually it was entirely manufactured and not that…

View original 1,224 more words

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Ag Sugradh sa Sneachta

The many faces of the superhero scientist modeling Ag Sugradh sa Sneachta Cowl, just released! Buy Now!

This is a stranded colour work cowl featuring puppies frolicking in the snow. Ag Sugradh sa Sneachta translates as playing in the snow.

The cowl is available in three sizes, but easily adaptable to alternative sizes. The sizes are 53 cm, 60, and 67 cm in circumference. It is knit in the round from the bottom up with a garter stitch border. The stranded colour work uses just two colours per row.
The sample, shown here in medium, is knit with Debbie Bliss Fine Donegal fingering weight yarn in colour ways Snowdrift and Teal. The cowl used less than half a ball of each colour in the medium size. The yarn is spun in Co. Donegal and has the distinctive tweedy appearance of many Irish yarns. The added cashmere makes it soft enough to wear next to your skin too!

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Until, Friday the 13th of February, if you buy Ag Sugradh sa Sneachta pattern you can get any one of my other patterns free! Enter coupon code madra at the checkout. Wahoo!

 

 

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Dáithí

Another day, another new pattern! Daíthí finger-less glove pattern is now available!

These pair of finger-less mittens are made from Irish wool sheared from Christine’s pet sheep in County Leitrim and spun by Natural Fibre Company in Britain. Christine of Formerly Fleece then dyes the yarn using natural dyes or sometimes, the yarn is dyed at the mill!

The gloves, pictured here in large, are named for my fear cheile, who declared an urgent need for a pair of finger-less mittens! They are knit in the round starting with a twisted rib cuff, continuing in Stocking stitch with a twisted stitch motif on a reverse stocking stitch background and increasing for the thumb gusset. Stitches are set aside for the thumb while continuing with the remainder of the mitten and casting off with an i cord trim.

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Nóinín Beret

 

Nóinín Beret pattern is now available for purchase.

The beret, available in three sizes and shown here in medium, is suitable for a child or adult, depending on how you prefer to wear the hat. For the most slouch, choose the large size.The hat is knit from the top down, starting with a short icord and ending with an icord brim, which fits snuggly. The hat, knit in the round, increases with yarn overs at the crown, before flowing into the chevron lace. This concentric crown and petal lace give the hat its name, Nóinín or in English, Daisy!